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Forthcoming events

2nd Oct 2017

e-WASH in Urban Emergencies

RedR UK, 2 October 2017 to 13 November 2017

PLEASE NOTE: You cannot attend this course without first undertaking either the on-line or face to face Urban Humanitarianism Course. You can sign up to this course here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-urban-humanitarianism-tickets-34966573964

ABOUT THE COURSE
Aid agencies have struggled to effectively respond to recent urban emergencies, with many of their WASH staff lacking the necessary knowledge and expertise in urban response. The urban context is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies. The kind of response required is greatly affected by the type of disaster and the different urban environments, whether huge cities; medium sized towns; peri-urban or slum areas. International aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers.

It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities.

Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or for instance income opportunities. Hygiene promotion needs to be tailored to a much more diverse audience and ways of messaging need to mimic urban methods.

Typical emergency WASH responses are often inappropriate in urban areas: emergency water distribution often marginalises small scale water sellers; pit latrines are not always the most culturally appropriate solution or physically possible as space is limited and land ownership disputed.
The WASH in Urban Emergencies course will equip experienced WASH humanitarians with the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively work in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The target audience for this course are WASH humanitarians, with some knowledge of both technical (engineering) and soft (hygiene promotion) WASH interventions and practical experience in at least one of these fields.

COURSE CONTENT
This course builds upon the material covered in our Urban Humanitarianism course which participants must have previously attended.

Sessions covered will include:
WASH standards & guidelines in urban emergencies
Water & sanitation technologies in urban context
hygiene promotion in urban context
solid waste and disaster waste management

COURSE METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated on-line course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day or five hours per week on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be online to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the online learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

Apply here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-wash-in-urban-emergencies-tickets-34966755507

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17th Oct 2017

Humanitarian Evidence Programme: What can we learn about identifying and prioritizing vulnerable people from shelter self-recovery and urban response evidence?

Oxfam, 17 October 2017

Join the Humanitarian Evidence Programme team (Oxfam/Tufts University), systematic review authors Elizabeth Parker (Independent – Shelter), Victoria Maynard (University College London – Shelter) and Ronak Patel (Harvard Humanitarian Initiative – urban crises), and Lucy Earle (Urban Crises Programme, DFID), to discuss the findings of two reviews and syntheses of the research evidence:

   • bullet What examples emerge of good practice and successful interventions?
   • bullet What do we know about what works and what doesn’t in terms of identifying and prioritizing those most in need? How do we classify and contextualize ‘vulnerability’ in practice?
   • bullet What data can governments and humanitarian agencies collect before, during, and after a crisis that might help improve humanitarian response in urban contexts or shelter self-recovery?
   • bullet What are the gaps in the evidence base and what can researchers and practitioners do to generate better evidence in the future?

Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1618601348082279682

You can send us specific questions of your own when you register for the event or on the day via the webinar chat function. You can also join the #HumanitarianEvidence conversation on Twitter.

The webinar will be recorded and available at a later date, alongside other programme outputs (including evidence briefs and guides) at:
http://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/our-work/humanitarian/humanitarian-evidence-programme
http://fic.tufts.edu/research-item/the-humanitarian-evidence-program/.

The Humanitarian Evidence Programme is a partnership between Oxfam GB and the Feinstein International Center at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University. It is funded by the United Kingdom (UK) government’s Department for International Development (DFID) through the Humanitarian Innovation and Evidence Programme. Views and opinions expressed do not necessarily represent those of Oxfam, Tufts or the UK government.

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19th Oct 2017

Choosing and defining urban areas for humanitarian response

ALNAP, CRS, UN Habitat, Impact Initiatives and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap., 19 October 2017

Within a city, how can humanitarians decide which specific area they will work in? And how can the boundaries of that area be defined?

Register here

Discussions about ‘area-based’, ‘neighbourhood’, ‘settlements’ or ‘integrated’ approaches are now a standard part of the discussion on how to improve urban humanitarian response.* Due to the nature and scale of an urban crisis, humanitarians are likely to need to find a way to focus their analysis, assessments and/or response – and often, that way is geographically. This represents a challenge because urban communities are often non-geographic, interconnected with the rest of the urban context, and their needs do not necessarily fit into one defined area.

Whichever approach an organisation decides to take, at one point or another they are likely to focus their analysis or programming on a specific area within the wider urban environment.

This special two hour ALNAP webinar will unpack two related challenges they may face when doing so:

1) Choosing an area
In the first hour, we'll hear from CRS and UN Habitat, discussing how humanitarians can choose a defined geographic area/neighbourhood to work in, within an urban environment. Whether to undertake analysis or plan a response, how do we avoid choosing an area out of convenience, rather than based on need or appropriateness?

2) Defining boundaries
In the second hour we will hear from Impact Initiatives and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap. In particular, we'll be asking: where perceptions of neighbourhood boundaries do not always match up with official administrative units, and neighbourhoods are parallel to one another, how can we appropriately articulate what is inside or outside of our assessment or programming area and why?

Register here

*Note: This webinar will not focus on the merits of area-based and similar approaches, as this topic has already been explored in a previous urban webinar and is ongoing in various other fora

Register here

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30th Oct 2017

e-Shelter in Urban Emergencies

RedR UK, 30 October 2017 to 11 December 2017

PLEASE NOTE: You cannot attend this course without first undertaking either the on-line or face to face Urban Humanitarianism Course. You can sign up to this course here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-urban-humanitarianism-tickets-34966573964

ABOUT THE COURSE
Aid agencies have struggled to effectively respond to recent urban emergencies, with many of their shelter staff lacking the necessary knowledge and expertise in urban response. An urban emergency is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies. The kind of response required is greatly affected by the type of disaster and the different urban environments, whether huge cities; medium sized towns; peri-urban or slum areas. Aid agencies must adapt their work dramatically in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers.

It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities.

Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or, for instance, income opportunities. Typical emergency Shelter responses are often inappropriate in urban areas: local authorities and existing infrastructure must be respected; camp setups are not always an appropriate solution or physically possible as space is limited and land ownership disputed.

This on-line Shelter in Urban Emergencies course has been developed with the support and guidance of experienced Shelter practitioners from leading humanitarian agencies. It will help Shelter humanitarians with limited experience of working in an urban context to explore and develop the necessary skills and knowledge to work effectively in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The target audience for this course are Shelter humanitarians, with practical experience in the field.

COURSE CONTENT
This course builds upon the material covered in our Urban Humanitarianism course which participants must have previously attended.
Sessions covered will include:
- Shelter standards & guidelines
- Housing, land and property issues
- Partnerships
- Reconstruction and recovery
- Technical shelter solutions in urban contexts

COURSE METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated on-line course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day or five hours per week on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be on-line to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the on-line learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

Apply here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-shelter-in-urban-emergencies-tickets-34966672258

More details

24th Nov 2017

Introduction to Humanitarianism in Urban Settings

RedR UK, 24 November 2017 to 1 December 2017

ABOUT THE COURSE
Aid agencies in recent urban emergencies have often lacked the ability to respond effectively in these environments. The urban context is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies, requiring specialist technical support to make immediate repairs to infrastructure that aid agencies don’t have the capacity to offer.
International aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers. It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities.

The Introduction to Humanitarianism in Urban Settings course will equip private sector engineers and technical specialists with the necessary skills and knowledge to work effectively in the early stages of an urban emergency. This course aims to outline key issues associated with the humanitarian sector and the realities of working in urban emergencies. Whilst part of this course bears a strong parallel to our existing Essentials of Humanitarian Practice course, the material and case studies will be original and focussed on the urban and private sector context.
The course will examine the humanitarian context, the concept of humanitarian principles, the international humanitarian system, accountability, international law, individual responsibility, the potential impacts
and dilemmas of humanitarian responses and how the private sector can support a successful humanitarian
response.
COURSE CONTENT
Explain the timeline for a fast onset natural disaster.
Describe the urban post disaster context and the challenges that it presents.

List the actors in a humanitarian response, and to describe their roles and how they work together.

Explain the humanitarian guiding principles including standards and accountability.

Explain key words, terms and acronyms specific to the humanitarian sector.

Identify personal risks working in an urban emergency environment.
Describe their role within the humanitarian context and what will enable them to carry out that role.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Experienced engineers, project managers and technical specialists from private sector organisations with over five years’ professional experience in water supply, sanitation, construction or structural engineer-ing. They may have limited or no experience of working in a humanitarian setting but should have an interest in working in an emergency response to carry out technical assessments of urban infrastructure.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Please note this course consists of two days’ face-to-face training, with self-study before and between these days.
The course will be made up of four separate modules. Participants must attend/complete all of the modules.

Module 1 Pre-Course Reading to be carried out by participants prior to the first workshop.
Module 2 A one day workshop running from 8.30am until 5pm at the RedR office in London.
Module 3 Self Study to be carried out independently in the week between the first and second workshops.
Module 4 A one day workshop from 9am until 4pm at the RedR office in London.

Training methods will include a mixture of presentations by experts, group discussions and practical exercises.

Terms and Conditions
For full RedR UK terms and conditions, click here

To book your place on this course please follow this link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/introduction-to-humanitarianism-in-urban-settings-tickets-35137189279

Course fees are £80.00 for all participants.

More details