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3rd Jul 2017

e-Urban Humanitarianism

RedR UK, 3 July 2017 to 11 August 2017

ABOUT THE COURSE
As the world grows more urbanised, large scale disasters are increasingly impacting urban areas. The role aid agencies have and the response that they provide is changing from the more familiar rural or camp contexts. Urban emergencies have a higher level of complexity and the kind of response required is greatly affected by the different urban environments, whether huge cities, medium-sized towns, peri-urban or slum areas. Aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers. It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector services suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities. Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or, for instance, income opportunities. This Urban Humanitarianism course aims to explore and develop the necessary skills and knowledge of a humanitarian to effectively work in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
Participants should have an interest in working in an urban emergency response. This course presupposes a working knowledge of basic humanitarian principles.

COURSE CONTENT
Sessions covered will include:
• An introduction to urban disasters
• Defining and targeting affected populations in an urban context
• Urban stakeholders in emergencies and communications
• Coordination approaches for urban emergencies
• Multi-sector assessments in urban environments
• An introduction to market assessments and cash and voucher programming

FEES

This course is sponsored by Lloyd‘s Charities Trust- the fees are banded.
For this project, we are also running a “Bolt On” discount for those interested in participating in another one of our online courses in addition to E-Urban Humanitarianism (for example E-Wash in Urban Emergencies, E-Shelter in Urban Emergencies, E-USecurity, E-UDRR). If you have any queries about this please direct them to training@redr.org.uk

COURSE STRUCTURE & METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated online course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be online to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the online learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

More details

3rd Jul 2017

e-Urban Humanitarianism

RedR UK, 3 July 2017 to 11 August 2017

ABOUT THE COURSE
As the world grows more urbanised, large scale disasters are increasingly impacting urban areas. The role aid agencies have and the response that they provide is changing from the more familiar rural or camp contexts. Urban emergencies have a higher level of complexity and the kind of response required is greatly affected by the different urban environments, whether huge cities, medium-sized towns, peri-urban or slum areas. Aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers. It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector services suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities. Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or, for instance, income opportunities. This Urban Humanitarianism course aims to explore and develop the necessary skills and knowledge of a humanitarian to effectively work in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
Humanitarians who have at least two years’ experience working in emergency response.
This may or not be in an urban environment, but participants should have an interest in working in an urban emergency response. This course presupposes a working knowledge of basic humanitarian principles.

Book here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-urban-humanitarianism-tickets-34966573964

COURSE CONTENT
Sessions covered will include:
• An introduction to urban disasters
• Defining and targeting affected populations in an urban context
• Urban stakeholders in emergencies and communications
• Coordination approaches for urban emergencies
• Multi-sector assessments in urban environments
• An introduction to market assessments and cash and voucher programming

FEES

This course is sponsored by Lloyd‘s Charities Trust- the fees are banded.
For this project, we are also running a “Bolt On” discount for those interested in participating in another one of our online courses in addition to E-Urban Humanitarianism (for example E-Wash in Urban Emergencies, E-Shelter in Urban Emergencies, E-USecurity, E-UDRR). If you have any queries about this please direct them to training@redr.org.uk

COURSE STRUCTURE & METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated online course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be online to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the online learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

More details

6th Jul 2017

Data and Innovation Management in Humanitarian Action

Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs , 6 July 2017

The Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs at Fordham University is partnering with the Centre for Innovation at Leiden University to provide a one-of-a-kind training opportunity for humanitarians, technology experts, and other professionals interested in designing technological solutions of the future for humanitarian challenges of the present.

This five-day course will provide students with a deeper insight to the use of data and technology in their work in human rights protection, monitoring and evaluation, and operations management in humanitarian contexts. Students will learn how to effectively collect, interpret and share/communicate data in line with ethical humanitarian principles, as well as develop new tools for humanitarian action.

The course will introduce participants to a comprehensive understanding of how to select and adopt tools, strategies, and techniques for data and innovation management, especially as seen through the concrete application to challenges evident in contemporary humanitarian action.

Saturday and Sunday will consist of a scenario-based workshop, 72 Hours' Challenge: (Big) Data for Preparedness and Assessment. Participants will be challenged to participate in a hands-on simulation, using data for emergency response - from the field visit and rapid assessment stage through the quality assessment monitoring stage at later phases of emergency intervention.

The challenge will give students the experience to conduct a hands-on simulation in using data in field visits and rapid assessments at the onset of emergency and in ensuring emergency food security or quality assessment monitoring at later stages of an intervention.

Furthermore, the course will bring together experienced humanitarian professionals, allowing them the opportunity to devise innovative solutions to the real-world problems they experience all over the world. Collaboration among the students will ensure knowledge is effectively distributed across diverse sectors and organizations as well as consistency in implementation.

This course is open to professionals from the humanitarian, development, technology, social responsibility, and corporate sectors, as well as to Fordham graduate students and recent Fordham undergraduate alumni.

Learn more at: https://www.fordham.edu/info/23470/courses/9930/data_and_innovation_management_in_humanitarian_action

More details

6th Jul 2017

What can the Ebola Response teach us for future health outbreaks in cities?

ALNAP, 6 July 2017

Two years on, what can we learn from the largely urban Ebola outbreak in West Africa?

To reflect on this response, ALNAP will release four papers which capture learning from the urban Ebola Response in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. This was not just about places with insufficient healthcare infrastructure trying to cope with an epidemic. The fact that the outbreak happened in cities, where everything is interconnected, made this not only a healthcare crisis, but also a WASH, livelihoods, protection and education one, characteristics which can also be seen increasingly in urban healthcare crises, such as the current cholera outbreaks in Yemen and Haiti.

It was also not just about an epidemic with three different national patterns, but likely hundreds according to the WHO, all with their own transmission dynamics; all of which were not factored in as such despite how critical the understanding of context is for an urban response to be effective.

For the latest webinar in ALNAP’s urban webinar series, we will hear about the challenges and learnings around the urban-specific aspects of the Ebola response. Specialists who witnessed and acted on the ground will discuss their experiences working in contexts of urban quarantine, navigating population movement and the long road to finding effective ways to communicate and engage with affected people in the response.

More details

26th Jul 2017

Urban Humanitarian Emergencies Course

Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, 26 July 2017 to 28 July 2017

Humanitarian organizations, international agencies and governments that serve populations affected by crises find themselves increasingly in urban settings. Agencies face new challenges, and some potential advantages, in these complex urban environments and are only just learning how to approach them. These new challenges take many forms: complicated physical layouts, poorly prepared institutions and infrastructure, a mixed target population of refugees and underserved locals. Furthermore, coordination of NGOs, communities as well as local authorities calls for urgent education and training in urban crises.

The Urban Humanitarian Emergencies Course is a three-day training organized by the Academy's Lavine Family Humanitarian Studies Initiative to train humanitarian professionals on the current issues and practices involved in this unique and expanding area of research and practice. The course faculty is experienced in humanitarian training and has on-the-ground experience with humanitarian crises in urban areas.

Register here: http://hhi.harvard.edu/content/urban-humanitarian-emergencies-course

More details

2nd Oct 2017

e-WASH in Urban Emergencies

RedR UK, 2 October 2017 to 13 November 2017

PLEASE NOTE: You cannot attend this course without first undertaking either the on-line or face to face Urban Humanitarianism Course. You can sign up to this course here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-urban-humanitarianism-tickets-34966573964

ABOUT THE COURSE
Aid agencies have struggled to effectively respond to recent urban emergencies, with many of their WASH staff lacking the necessary knowledge and expertise in urban response. The urban context is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies. The kind of response required is greatly affected by the type of disaster and the different urban environments, whether huge cities; medium sized towns; peri-urban or slum areas. International aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers.

It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities.

Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or for instance income opportunities. Hygiene promotion needs to be tailored to a much more diverse audience and ways of messaging need to mimic urban methods.

Typical emergency WASH responses are often inappropriate in urban areas: emergency water distribution often marginalises small scale water sellers; pit latrines are not always the most culturally appropriate solution or physically possible as space is limited and land ownership disputed.
The WASH in Urban Emergencies course will equip experienced WASH humanitarians with the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively work in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The target audience for this course are WASH humanitarians, with some knowledge of both technical (engineering) and soft (hygiene promotion) WASH interventions and practical experience in at least one of these fields.

COURSE CONTENT
This course builds upon the material covered in our Urban Humanitarianism course which participants must have previously attended.

Sessions covered will include:
WASH standards & guidelines in urban emergencies
Water & sanitation technologies in urban context
hygiene promotion in urban context
solid waste and disaster waste management

COURSE METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated on-line course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day or five hours per week on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be online to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the online learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

Apply here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-wash-in-urban-emergencies-tickets-34966755507

More details

2nd Oct 2017

Education in Emergencies 4

Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs , 2 October 2017 to 6 October 2017

Course Description: With close to 30 million children living in conflict-affected countries, and hundreds of thousands of families displaced by natural disasters and the effects of climate related events, education in times of crisis and conflict is indispensable to achieving the goal of universal education. The Education in Emergencies course provides tools to design and implement educational projects from the emergency phase to post-conflict situations, with a special emphasis on the mechanisms required to improve the quality of education during and after humanitarian crises. This course also focuses on the main challenges children face during forced displacement, from child recruitment to food security.

Location: Nairobi, Kenya

Cost: All of the IIHA short courses can be taken for academic credit and counted towards Fordham University's Master's in International Humanitarian Action (MIHA) or taken individually, independent from the MIHA at a reduced cost. For those who wish to receive academic credit, there is a course fee of $1,600 USD. Students who choose to take the course for academic credit will earn two credit hours upon completion. For those who do not wish to receive formal academic credit, the course fee is reduced to $915 USD.

Application Deadline: 12/09/2016

Apply: To take this course, please Apply Here.

To learn more about this course, please view the individual Course Posting. For a complete list of IIHA courses, please view the Course Calendar on our website.
If you have questions, please contact miha@fordham.edu for more information.

About the IIHA:
The Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) at Fordham University offers humanitarian training courses in various locations around the world. With the creation of a Master's in Humanitarian Action (MIHA), the Institute offers a flexible yet academically rigorous training model for aid practitioners looking to further their knowledge and skills in the humanitarian sector.

More details

30th Oct 2017

e-Shelter in Urban Emergencies

RedR UK, 30 October 2017 to 11 December 2017

PLEASE NOTE: You cannot attend this course without first undertaking either the on-line or face to face Urban Humanitarianism Course. You can sign up to this course here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-urban-humanitarianism-tickets-34966573964

ABOUT THE COURSE
Aid agencies have struggled to effectively respond to recent urban emergencies, with many of their shelter staff lacking the necessary knowledge and expertise in urban response. An urban emergency is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies. The kind of response required is greatly affected by the type of disaster and the different urban environments, whether huge cities; medium sized towns; peri-urban or slum areas. Aid agencies must adapt their work dramatically in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers.

It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities.

Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or, for instance, income opportunities. Typical emergency Shelter responses are often inappropriate in urban areas: local authorities and existing infrastructure must be respected; camp setups are not always an appropriate solution or physically possible as space is limited and land ownership disputed.

This on-line Shelter in Urban Emergencies course has been developed with the support and guidance of experienced Shelter practitioners from leading humanitarian agencies. It will help Shelter humanitarians with limited experience of working in an urban context to explore and develop the necessary skills and knowledge to work effectively in the early stages of an urban emergency.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The target audience for this course are Shelter humanitarians, with practical experience in the field.

COURSE CONTENT
This course builds upon the material covered in our Urban Humanitarianism course which participants must have previously attended.
Sessions covered will include:
- Shelter standards & guidelines
- Housing, land and property issues
- Partnerships
- Reconstruction and recovery
- Technical shelter solutions in urban contexts

COURSE METHODOLOGY
The duration of the facilitated on-line course is 6 consecutive weeks. All activities take place on-line, but it is expected that you spend around 1 hr per working day or five hours per week on participating in team activities and completing individual tasks.

All the activities are asynchronous, so there aren’t fixed times when you need to be on-line to meet with all the others in the group. Yet, with plenty of discussions it often feels like real time, with the added advantage that you can take a little longer to formulate your contributions. The asynchronous model means that you can log in when convenient for you, whether that is during the working day, in the evening at home or while traveling. However, you need to work on the same topics in the same weeks as other participants so you will need to access the on-line learning site regularly to contribute.

The most important thing is that participants are fully committed to completing the course and sharing their own experiences with the other participants they will be working with. The maximum number of participants is 24.

Apply here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/e-shelter-in-urban-emergencies-tickets-34966672258

More details